#6 – Testing Talks

Testing Talks – Episode 169 With JeanAnn Harrison.

 

In this week’s testing podcast episode, Joe interviews JeanAnn, a Software testing manager who has been in the software quality assurance field for over 2 decades. JeanAnn begins by addressing techniques and best practices that make for a fluid testing process. I chose this particular episode because JeanAnn addressed automation in testing and critical thinking in testing. With the development of modern technology, software automation is the next big thing in the world today.

Another big thing she talked about was critical thinking. Critical thinking often refers to the ability to try different thought processes and develop new methodologies to achieve an already familiar goal. The ability to think outside the box, pushing yourself to look at things in a different way. To evolve ones thinking ability in testing, we can try to look at things outside the software-testing field. By doing this, one is able to develop logical means that are often necessary to find product boundaries and limits. Asking yourself questions like how? , when? , what ? , where ?. These simple questions often answers most of the questions for the software testers and help develop solutions and bugs that need to found. By asking these questions, you are able to see how the software or product could be integrated into computer systems, the kind of problems that can arise by implementing the new product/technology and what can be done to resolve issues should they arrive. Another big thing that she addressed was understanding software’s users and customer base. Developing apps and programs without expected audience leads to many problems in the software world. Imagine developing a mobile application for 70 year olds but its integrated into the latest iphone technology. This would not work out because most of the people in that range no longer have the ability to adapt to new technology or even use a cellular device. Again imagine developing a walker for blind people which has an activation switch installed on the side with an on and off reading. This will be physically challenging and difficult for the blind to optimally use the product. It might be the best product that all blind people needs but its inability to incorporate and account for the blind would instantly make it a bad design or a bad product to acquire. Simply put if you know your user base, you are able to find out what needs to be designed for the product to properly fit the needs of the users and customers.

 

 

LINK

 

https://testingpodcast.com/169-critical-thinking-in-testing-with-jeanann-harrison/

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